idaho dog leash laws

Last year, 34 people were killed in dog attacks throughout the United States. Luckily, most dog bite accidents are not fatal, but many cause serious injury. Most states, including Idaho, have laws in place to control aggressive dogs. The dog bite accident attorneys at Hansen Injury Law are experienced representing dog attack victims. We also make it a priority to educate our community about the law. In this article, we will break down the basics of Idaho dog leash laws.

What are the Idaho Dog Leash Laws?

Idaho’s rules about aggressive dogs deal mostly with securing “vicious” dogs. The laws state:

  • If a neighbor complains about a dog being allowed to run free, its owner must restrain it so that it remains on their own property
  • Any dog which bites or attacks an innocent bystander is “vicious”
  • Vicious dogs must be kept in a “secure enclosure,” such as a kennel. If it is outside of the enclosure, it must be effectively chained or leashed
    • If an owner fails to obey these laws multiple times, their dog may be put down by the state
  • If a dog kills or attacks another person’s animals, the owner of the dog is liable for damages. A person whose animals are attacked by another person’s dog can also justifiably kill the dog.

Many cities, including Boise, have city laws that require dogs to be on leashes when in public places. You can find your specific city laws by visiting the city website. A general rule-of-thumb regarding Idaho dog leash laws is that dogs need to be either on a leash or in a car if they are in public. When they are on your property, they can run free — as long as they do not fall under any of the state laws above.

If you are injured in a dog attack, you may be able to recover your losses. Our team of injury lawyers understands Idaho dog leash laws and knows how to get you what you deserve. Contact us today for a free consultation.

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