pedestrian safety in idaho

Do you walk to work or class? Do you have to cross busy intersections? Even if you just go on a walk in your neighborhood, pedestrian safety in Idaho should be on your mind.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports that 445 people end up in the emergency room due to a pedestrian-related traffic accident everyday. Many of these accidents up being fatal.

Stay safe as a pedestrian and make your way home safely each day using these 5 tips:

Increasing Pedestrian Safety in Idaho: 5 Tips

Use the sidewalk or shoulder

  • If there is a sidewalk available, use it. If there aren’t sidewalks available, walk on the shoulder of the road and be sure to face traffic. This way, you and any oncoming drivers can see each other.

Don’t be distracted

  • Looking at your phone while walking through a crosswalk, or otherwise being distracted, can increase the chances of an accident.
  • You need to be able to hear what’s happening around you, especially honking cars.

Use designated crosswalks

  • Jaywalking is illegal and dangerous. Use designated crosswalks to avoid collisions with oncoming drivers.
  • Automated crosswalks at stoplights are safest because drivers are more cautious around intersections.

Walking at night

  • Be extra cautious and alert at night. Visibility is reduced at night, so running at night is better on a track or at the gym.

Pedestrian right-of-way

  • As a pedestrian, you have the right-of-way on the roads. However, if there are no traffic signals, drivers have to let you cross.
  • If there are traffic signals, follow the intersection rules as if you were in a car.

Both pedestrians and drivers share the responsibility to keep roads and intersections safe. Follow these guidelines and pay attention to improve pedestrian safety in Idaho.

If you are injured in a pedestrian accident, contact us for a free injury case consultation.

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